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Camellia

China kǎ méi lì yà
Camellia Vertical Wall Scroll

卡梅莉婭 is the transliteration to Mandarin Chinese for the name Camellia.

Camellia

Japan kameria
Camellia Vertical Wall Scroll

カメリア is the name Camellia written in Katakana (phonetic Japanese).

This sounds like Camellia, but does not mean the camellia plant or leaf.

Instead of these characters, you may want to go with the name of the plant. Of course, camellia also means tea, as varieties of camellia plants provide the leaves for many kinds of Chinese and Japanese teas.


Note: Because this title is entirely Japanese Katakana , it should be written by a Japanese calligrapher.

Tea

China chá
Japan cha
Tea Vertical Wall Scroll

茶 means tea. It can refer to prepared tea (ready-to-drink) or to dry tea leaves.

The origin of tea is China but the same character is used in Japanese Kanji, and old Korean Hanja with the exact same meaning. Japanese and Korean even borrowed the pronunciation from Chinese (pronounced "cha" in all three languages).

It's said that an early doctor (or herbologist) in ancient China kept poisoning himself as he tried different new herb concoctions. He invented tea as a means to detoxify himself as he recovered from 1 of the 76 times he nearly poisoned himself to death. Tea is seen not just as a drink but as a form of medicine used to remove impurities from the body.

The word "chai" (used in many languages to refer to various teas) is derived from this Chinese word.

茶 also means camellia, as Asian teas are often based on the leaves of camellia plant varieties.


The following table may be helpful for those studying Chinese or Japanese...

Title CharactersRomaji(Romanized Japanese)Various forms of Romanized Chinese
Camellia卡梅莉婭
卡梅莉娅
kǎ méi lì yà
ka3 mei2 li4 ya4
ka mei li ya
kameiliya
k`a mei li ya
kameiliya
ka mei li ya
Camelliaカメリアkameria
Teachachá / cha2 / chach`a / cha
In some entries above you will see that characters have different versions above and below a line.
In these cases, the characters above the line are Traditional Chinese, while the ones below are Simplified Chinese.